In sixteenth-century England, as in our own culture, women’s clothing was clearly distinguished from men’s. Until the late Middle Ages, however, men and women had worn similar long, loose robes. During the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, clothing had been increasingly differentiated to emphasize and produce embodied sexual difference. Men’s robes were shortened to reveal their legs, and the codpiece was invented. Women acquired tight bodices that altered the shape of their breasts and low-cut gowns to display them, and their skirts, which remained long, were widened. In addition to producing visible signs of sexual difference, changes in clothing also produced differences in daily behavior. It was during this same period, for instance, that European women began using sidesaddles, a fashion that was brought to England near the end of the fourteenth century by Anne of Bohemia when she married the English king Richard II. However, gender was not the only or even the most important distinction that early modern English clothing enforced. In fact, although sumptuary laws contained elaborate regulations of male attire to ensure that men’s clothing would express their exact place in the social hierarchy, there was no legislation against cross-dressing. In late sixteenth and early seventeenth-century England, some women adopted the fashion of masculine attire, and although moralists strenuously condemned the practice, it was never made illegal. Moreover, male and female children were dressed in the same attire—in skirts—until they reached the age of seven. Apparently, the physical difference that separated boys from girls was not considered sufficiently significant to be marked by clothing, but the difference in social rank that separated one man from another was so important that clothing which obscured it was forbidden by law. Another indication that both age and status were at least as important as gender in determining an individual’s identity is the fact that medical casebooks referred to children of both sexes as ‘it’ until they reached puberty. In our own culture, by contrast, clothing is gendered from birth, but it is less reliable as an indicator of status and rank.
Phyllis Rackin, Shakespeare and Women (via goneril-and-regan)

(via notcuddles)


abomasnow:

hector-inhale:

abomasnow:

itswhatyouwant-need:

abomasnow:

reasons you should fuck me:

  • my hair is really soft and it’ll feel nice balled up in your fist when you take me from behind

Why don’t girls ever actually talk like this, do you even know how much of a turn on that would be?! Do you?!

i’m a boy

Why would a guy post that ?

have you ever heard of homosexuals

(via latining)


CARING FOR YOUR INTROVERT! A Very Popular Article About Real Things and Problems

sadybusiness:

  • Please, stop using the term “your introvert” 
  • Please, cease writing, reblogging, quoting, or in all other ways transmitting information about “your introvert,” signs that you may be “an introvert” (including .GIFs), and the social persecution — nay, oppression — of “us introverts.” 
  • You know that the MBTI is basically a party trick, right? It’s fun, and it feels perceptive, but any given personality test result is prone to be personalized and selectively remembered by its recipients, all the more so if they have a belief in its methodology: If someone says “it’s a psychic reading,” people who believe in psychics will absorb it more eagerly, if someone says “it’s the stars,” people who believe in a given astrological system will absorb it more eagerly, if someone says “it’s science,” pretty much everyone will absorb it eagerly, because, yay, Science! Hence the MBTI. 
  • Don’t believe me? Take it three times in three years. Your results will change. 
  • Anyway, there are four letters. Why doesn’t anyone focus on the other three letters? Extrovert v. Introvert is only one polarity.
  • Why, for example, has the mass consciousness not seized on the possibilities of “F” versus “T?” Feeling versus Thinking, that’s a fun pair of letters. I always get “feeling.” That’s the only one that never really changes. I always choose “mercy” over “justice” when it comes to the word-pairing choices. The books are very careful to explain that 75% of women are “feeling,” whereas 75% of men are “thinking.” This is why men and women, scientifically speaking, cannot understand each other. It is clearly not a stereotype, or sexist, because Science says it’s true. 
  • Men Never Choose Mercy: That’s the title of my incredibly misandrist relationship-communications book, based on the infallible science of the MBTI. 
  • Please stop caring for your introvert. 
  • Go away from your introvert. Leave your introvert to its devices. Your introvert needs no further caring.  
  • No, it’s okay, your introvert is fine. Your introvert was just reading. 
  • Your introvert got the text message.
  • That sounded like fun. It is a shame that your introvert couldn’t make it. 
  • Your introvert doesn’t hate everybody. Your introvert just doesn’t like everybody. There is a difference. 
  • Your introvert likes you. 
  • Please! Cease oppressing the introvert! Use its name! 

(via latining)


bombing:

one of my favorite things is when you give a baby your finger and they hold on to it as tight as they can. it’s funny because they don’t even come close to having the amount of muscle power i do. do you really think you can hold me here haha. i’ll crush you


apihtawikosisan:

marcinthelotus:

mirkwood:

misskittystryker:

naamahdarling:

behelitohs:

lindseywalnut:

utterlyfubar:

rcmclachlan:

doodlyood:

spinachandrice:

theonewholovesbooks:

thatfilthyanimal:

fawnthefeminist:

Young women are having difficulty accessing tubal ligation, despite it being a relatively safe (death rate is 1-2 per 100,000) and elective surgery.

There is a waiting period of 30 days for women seeking tubal ligation, yet no waiting period for men seeking vasectomies. 
(Source)


Young women are often discriminated against when seeking sterilization. Many doctors ask offensive questions (“What if you met a billionaire who wanted to have kids with you?”), state categorically that their patients are too young to consider the surgery, and generally act as though, as one woman who tried unsuccessfully to be sterilized at the age of 21 in the U.K. put it, ”just because I was a woman, I’d reach a point where an urge to breed would overcome all rational thought.” (Perhaps unsurprisingly, that woman’s 25-year-old husband faced no such presumptions when he asked his doctor for a vasectomy. The procedure was quickly approved.)
(Source)


Say that at 18 I slap down enough money so I could have my whole body covered head-to-toe in tattoos, piercings all over myself, a mountain of cigarettes, plastic surgery, and plan to have like 20 babies… but if I try at all to safely make it impossible for me to breed for the sake of my health suddenly its like WOAH THERE SLOW DOWN MISSY YOU’RE NOT READY FOR THIS KIND OF COMMITMENT YET

I have stage III Endometriosis, which means I have to get my uterus removed because I literally have terrible cramps ALL THE TIME and not just when I’m on my period. Now, I’ve always said I don’t want any children for personal reasons and I don’t need my uterus, really. I am not worried about that surgery and I don’t feel any kind of nostalgia over an organ I won’t ever use. 
The thing is, my doctor is a ‘man’. This ‘man’ told me I had to get pregnant right now before it’s too late. I told him I didn’t want to get pregnant and explained the multiple reasons but what, do you ask, did my doctor have to say about this? 'Well, better have a kid now because just imagine how depressing it must be being a thirty-something woman without children and a husband?'
I was diagnosed a year ago. I should have gone through surgery six months ago and I still can’t find a doctor that will perform the surgery without trying to force me to have children first. Basically, if you’re a woman you don’t have a say in what can and cannot be done to your body without a shitload of people getting in the way AND I’M FUCKING SICK OF IT.

Women are getting non-consensually sterilized in prison but no doctors in my area while tie my tubes at 24 because I might regret it? Fuck you, doctors. I have more purpose in life than dropping babies. Some of those women in prison are probably great moms and I have no interest in parenting. Let us have a say!

A dear friend of mine wanted to have her tubes tied.  She was about to give birth to twins and the doctors wouldn’t consent because she wasn’t 21 yet.  She had already had children and they still refused to let her have the procedure.

My friend got a vasectomy a week after asking his doctor for one, no problem. He was 25.
Me? I’ve asked 4 different doctors for some kind of permanent sterilisation—tubal ligation or Essure or whatever—and I get a pat on the head and a “You’d regret it if you did.”
Oh, DIDN’T REALIZE YOU HAD A DIRECT LINE TO MY BRAIN.

On the flip side, as a vagina-having person who had her tubes tied at the age of 26 (after having 4 children, however):
MY HUSBAND HAD TO SIGN A CONSENT FORM IN ORDER FOR ME TO HAVE THE PROCEDURE DONE.
How many times have we heard stories about husbands having vasectomies behind their wives backs and never telling them, letting those wives wallow in guilt and misery, thinking it’s their fault that they can’t get pregnant?
And yet I had had to get my husband’s permission to have my tubes tied.
(Obviously this was a decision we’d talked about extensively beforehand, so it’s not like he was about to say no, but we both couldn’t believe the fucking audacity of the hospital, asking HIS permission for ME to do something with MY body.  In fact, he said as much to the nurse that brought in the forms.)

This is fucked up. Your body is no one’s business but your own. Even if there’s no law against young sterilization, women still suffer just from societal expectations, which influence doctors who are unable to be objective. People think they’re being caring but are actually just afraid of anything that goes outside of their preconceived notions of what people should do with their lives. 

I got mine at 23 (no prior children).  Via the Health Department in the state I was living in at the time.  It was on a sliding scale, and because I was poor- it was free.I ended up having to wait a year and have a psychological evaluation.  Considering my tubal was free and they were actually giving one to me, I considered this a small price to pay at the time.In the state I live in now, I never would have been able to get one that easily.  I was EXTREMELY lucky.  I consider it a minor miracle, frankly.

Still, the psych eval is hella fucking offensive.  And it does make me wonder whether sterilization would have been denied to someone like me, who is certified disabled with a mental illness.  Because I might be too crazy to make such a permanent decision (but not too crazy to decide to HAVE a kid who would likely inherit the same disorders I have*).
* I have no problem with people who have mental illnesses and DO want to have kids.  I’m just not doing it, and I’m not pretending that the desire not to pass on the hellishness of my particular brand of crazy isn’t a part of that.

I found that arguing that I was too crazy to take care of a kid and would pass my crazy down to one was enough to get them to agree. 

White women though. White able bodied women.They’re STILL sterlising incarcerated black women as well as disabled people. And they’ve got a history of forcibly sterlising black and Indigenous American women but they keep white able bodied women forced to have babies.That’s real important to include in this whole scenario. Because it really makes you see exactly what the point is.

I know two American women (who talk about getting the procedure) who are both friends of the family and both in their mid 20’s. One is black and latina woman and got the procedure without many obstacles. The other is white and her doctors all refused to give her one even though she already had one child (a girl) and said they’d consider it once she was either in her thirties or had a boy as well. Went on about a “one of each” policy? Anyways I JUST heard them discussing it at a BBQ while we were visiting stateside last month and I thought it was fucked up and relevant to this post.

It was common practice (in Canada) when my mom was just starting our family, for doctors to push hysterectomies on Native and poor women while they were in labour, getting them to sign release forms during the worst pain of their lives. Then again, during those years they sometimes didn’t bother to ask, and Native women were getting sterilized without finding out until later, and Alberta is infamous for legislating a eugenic program from 1928-1972 allowing for the forced sterilization of people with mental disabilities and mental illnesses.
They STILL push Native and poor women to agree to sterilization, hounding women during very vulnerable moments, telling us we have too many kids. I have no idea how it is for White women here in Canada in terms of electing to have one.

apihtawikosisan:

marcinthelotus:

mirkwood:

misskittystryker:

naamahdarling:

behelitohs:

lindseywalnut:

utterlyfubar:

rcmclachlan:

doodlyood:

spinachandrice:

theonewholovesbooks:

thatfilthyanimal:

fawnthefeminist:

Young women are having difficulty accessing tubal ligation, despite it being a relatively safe (death rate is 1-2 per 100,000) and elective surgery.

There is a waiting period of 30 days for women seeking tubal ligation, yet no waiting period for men seeking vasectomies. 

(Source)

Young women are often discriminated against when seeking sterilization. Many doctors ask offensive questions (“What if you met a billionaire who wanted to have kids with you?”), state categorically that their patients are too young to consider the surgery, and generally act as though, as one woman who tried unsuccessfully to be sterilized at the age of 21 in the U.K. put it, ”just because I was a woman, I’d reach a point where an urge to breed would overcome all rational thought.” (Perhaps unsurprisingly, that woman’s 25-year-old husband faced no such presumptions when he asked his doctor for a vasectomy. The procedure was quickly approved.)

(Source)

Say that at 18 I slap down enough money so I could have my whole body covered head-to-toe in tattoos, piercings all over myself, a mountain of cigarettes, plastic surgery, and plan to have like 20 babies… but if I try at all to safely make it impossible for me to breed for the sake of my health suddenly its like WOAH THERE SLOW DOWN MISSY YOU’RE NOT READY FOR THIS KIND OF COMMITMENT YET

I have stage III Endometriosis, which means I have to get my uterus removed because I literally have terrible cramps ALL THE TIME and not just when I’m on my period. Now, I’ve always said I don’t want any children for personal reasons and I don’t need my uterus, really. I am not worried about that surgery and I don’t feel any kind of nostalgia over an organ I won’t ever use. 

The thing is, my doctor is a ‘man’. This ‘man’ told me I had to get pregnant right now before it’s too late. I told him I didn’t want to get pregnant and explained the multiple reasons but what, do you ask, did my doctor have to say about this? 'Well, better have a kid now because just imagine how depressing it must be being a thirty-something woman without children and a husband?'

I was diagnosed a year ago. I should have gone through surgery six months ago and I still can’t find a doctor that will perform the surgery without trying to force me to have children first. Basically, if you’re a woman you don’t have a say in what can and cannot be done to your body without a shitload of people getting in the way AND I’M FUCKING SICK OF IT.

Women are getting non-consensually sterilized in prison but no doctors in my area while tie my tubes at 24 because I might regret it? Fuck you, doctors. I have more purpose in life than dropping babies. Some of those women in prison are probably great moms and I have no interest in parenting. Let us have a say!

A dear friend of mine wanted to have her tubes tied.  She was about to give birth to twins and the doctors wouldn’t consent because she wasn’t 21 yet.  She had already had children and they still refused to let her have the procedure.

My friend got a vasectomy a week after asking his doctor for one, no problem. He was 25.

Me? I’ve asked 4 different doctors for some kind of permanent sterilisation—tubal ligation or Essure or whatever—and I get a pat on the head and a “You’d regret it if you did.”

Oh, DIDN’T REALIZE YOU HAD A DIRECT LINE TO MY BRAIN.

On the flip side, as a vagina-having person who had her tubes tied at the age of 26 (after having 4 children, however):

MY HUSBAND HAD TO SIGN A CONSENT FORM IN ORDER FOR ME TO HAVE THE PROCEDURE DONE.

How many times have we heard stories about husbands having vasectomies behind their wives backs and never telling them, letting those wives wallow in guilt and misery, thinking it’s their fault that they can’t get pregnant?

And yet I had had to get my husband’s permission to have my tubes tied.

(Obviously this was a decision we’d talked about extensively beforehand, so it’s not like he was about to say no, but we both couldn’t believe the fucking audacity of the hospital, asking HIS permission for ME to do something with MY body.  In fact, he said as much to the nurse that brought in the forms.)

This is fucked up. Your body is no one’s business but your own. Even if there’s no law against young sterilization, women still suffer just from societal expectations, which influence doctors who are unable to be objective. People think they’re being caring but are actually just afraid of anything that goes outside of their preconceived notions of what people should do with their lives. 

I got mine at 23 (no prior children).  Via the Health Department in the state I was living in at the time.  It was on a sliding scale, and because I was poor- it was free.

I ended up having to wait a year and have a psychological evaluation.  Considering my tubal was free and they were actually giving one to me, I considered this a small price to pay at the time.

In the state I live in now, I never would have been able to get one that easily.  I was EXTREMELY lucky.  I consider it a minor miracle, frankly.

Still, the psych eval is hella fucking offensive.  And it does make me wonder whether sterilization would have been denied to someone like me, who is certified disabled with a mental illness.  Because I might be too crazy to make such a permanent decision (but not too crazy to decide to HAVE a kid who would likely inherit the same disorders I have*).

* I have no problem with people who have mental illnesses and DO want to have kids.  I’m just not doing it, and I’m not pretending that the desire not to pass on the hellishness of my particular brand of crazy isn’t a part of that.

I found that arguing that I was too crazy to take care of a kid and would pass my crazy down to one was enough to get them to agree. 

White women though. White able bodied women.

They’re STILL sterlising incarcerated black women as well as disabled people. And they’ve got a history of forcibly sterlising black and Indigenous American women but they keep white able bodied women forced to have babies.

That’s real important to include in this whole scenario. Because it really makes you see exactly what the point is.

I know two American women (who talk about getting the procedure) who are both friends of the family and both in their mid 20’s. One is black and latina woman and got the procedure without many obstacles. The other is white and her doctors all refused to give her one even though she already had one child (a girl) and said they’d consider it once she was either in her thirties or had a boy as well. Went on about a “one of each” policy? Anyways I JUST heard them discussing it at a BBQ while we were visiting stateside last month and I thought it was fucked up and relevant to this post.

It was common practice (in Canada) when my mom was just starting our family, for doctors to push hysterectomies on Native and poor women while they were in labour, getting them to sign release forms during the worst pain of their lives. Then again, during those years they sometimes didn’t bother to ask, and Native women were getting sterilized without finding out until later, and Alberta is infamous for legislating a eugenic program from 1928-1972 allowing for the forced sterilization of people with mental disabilities and mental illnesses.

They STILL push Native and poor women to agree to sterilization, hounding women during very vulnerable moments, telling us we have too many kids. I have no idea how it is for White women here in Canada in terms of electing to have one.

(via apihtawikosisan-deactivated2014)



Q
Do you wish your parents hadn't adopted you? I can't get read from your posts. I get your views on the adoption system and your disgust towards it. But I can't tell if you wish they hadn't adopted you, if you don't really view them as your parents. Just curious. Feel free to ignore.
Anonymous
A

glittergeek:

peaceshannon:

peaceshannon:

well. i debated whether i should answer this. but i decided to just go for it. 

i almost didn’t answer this question because i think it’s an irrelevant question. it’s also a ridiculously simple question for an abundantly complicated relationship. it’s irrelevant because it’s a waste of time and energy to wish that my parents hadn’t adopted me. if i wished that, does it mean that i could go back in time and change anything? if i didn’t wish that, does it mean that everything regarding my relationship with my parents is rainbows and unicorns?

i wrote about why it’s irrelevent in this postsaying that i think korea should stop international adoption doesn’t mean that i denounce my own adoption. i neither denounce it or celebrate it, i simply accept it.  nor do i mourn the person i might’ve been or glorify the person that i have become.

it also dismisses the human element from my relationship with my parents. yes, i am disgusted with the adoption industry (let’s call it what it is) although i’ve stated that i’m not 100% against adoption, in theory. anyways, my parents were/are far from perfect as (adoptive) parents. but many people seem to be super concerned with my parents feelings regarding my feelings about adoption ㅡㅡ why?? are their feelings about my feelings more important than my feelings? does that make any sense??

do i view my parents as my parents? yes. regardless of our complicated relationship, i view them as my american parents. but i also think i have more than one set of parents. i do love my adoptive parents, i do appreciate the things they did right. but that doesn’t mean i’m not allowed to be critical about the many and sometimes very serious things that they did wrong.

again, does that mean i wish they hadn’t adopted me? what does that question even mean? you asked the question actually twice in your ask so i’m answering it again to point out the urgency with which you seem to need to know the answer to this question (although you did say feel free to ignore?). again, it seems like a totally irrelevant question to me but it’s one that many seem to want to know the answer to. and i think that that’s almost more telling. why do people want to know this? is it because they want to check whether or not i am appropriately grateful (by whatever standards they are measuring by) to my adoptive parents? to me, in that question, there’s an underlying implication that i should be grateful to have been adopted and therefore did not waste away in an orphanage and/or forced to become prostitute or any of the other horrid outcomes that would have surely been my fate if i had not been adopted. yes, adoptees are fed these stories of how we would’ve ended up if we hadn’t been ‘saved’ by our parents and i think this is to keep adoptees in line and eternally grateful. i think that’s psychologically abusive, but it’s an attitude that is pervasive throughout (western) society and the romance/myth surrounding the adoption story. 

so. 

do i wish my parents hadn’t adopted me? no. because that’s a pointless exercise. it’s a waste of time and energy. do i wish that poor, women of color had just as much of a right to raise their children as the middle/upper class, white women who eventually get to raise them through adoption? yes.

that is the relevant question. one that can actually be used for change and progress. and that is why i work with kumfa.

because i’ve gotten a couple more asks along this vein, i am reblogging this ask.

this person is brilliant, this post is amazing, read it.


whitepajamas:

I forgot the name of an actor and googled literally the only thing I could remember about him. 

whitepajamas:

I forgot the name of an actor and googled literally the only thing I could remember about him. 


Question

sadybusiness:

I’m trying to research the feminist protests of Ted Hughes that took place after Plath’s death — years after, I think; they seem to have happened in the ’70s, after everything had been published — but it’s all cloaked in mystery and obscure language about “the picketers” and “the women’s libbers” and “the feminist orthodoxy of the time that Hughes killed Plath.” You know, very obscure “the feminists, yes ALL OF THE FEMINISTS, were involved and then did something” language that doesn’t tell you who did what or when. Everyone agrees that feminists made Ted Hughes’ life hell for a while, and that ALL FEMINISTS EVERYWHERE thought he killed her because they were irrational bitch-monsters and also wrong about everything, but no-one seems to have any concrete details as to where, when, and how these mythical feminists did their work. 

The only people who will take any responsibility and/or give details on that front are Robin Morgan — Hughes threatened to sue her publisher if she included “The Arraignment” (the “I accuse/Ted Hughes” poem) in her book “Monster,” and the poem had to be pulled; she says that the protesters called themselves “Arraignment Women,” and published “pirate” copies of the poem, and also, that the Arraignment Women were the ones who picketed Hughes and carved his name off Plath’s gravestone — and Jacqueline Rose, who wrote that Ted Hughes sent her threatening letters after she argued for a potential lesbian interpretation of “The Rabbit Catcher,” but never engaged in protests of any kind, other than writing about how weird it was to deal with him. 

So, you all read a lot, and are generally smarter and more literary than I am. Are there any biographies or histories that might give a slightly less “and also there were some crazy feminists who did something vague” account of what those protests were, and what the protesters were actually doing and saying? 


I once told a joke about a straight person.

They came after me in droves.

Each one singing the same:

Don’t fight fire with fire.

*

What they mean is: Don’t fight fire with anything.

Do not fight fire with water.

Do not fight fire with foam.

Do not evacuate the people.

Do not sound the alarms.

Do not crawl coughing and choking and spluttering to safety.

Do not barricade the door with damp towels.

Do not wave a white flag out of the window.

Do not take the plunge from several storeys up.

Do not shed a tear for your lover trapped behind a wall of flame.

Do not curse the combination of fuel, heat, and oxygen.

Do not ask why the fire fighters are not coming.

*

When they say: Don’t fight fire with fire.

What they mean is: Stand and burn.

Stand and Burn by Claudia Boleyn.  (via claudiaboleyn)

(via whitepajamas)


The problem with escapism is that when you read or write a book society is in the chair with you. You can’t escape your history or your culture. So the idea that because fantasy books aren’t about the real world they therefore ‘escape’ is ridiculous. Fantasy is still written and read through the filters of social reality. That’s why some fantasies (like Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels) are so directly allegorical—but even the most surreal and bizarre fantasy can’t help but reverberate around the reader’s awareness of their own reality, even if in a confusing and unclear way.
China Miéville, interviewed about how his fantasy writing interacts with his politics in Issue 88 of International Socialism Journal (2000). (via kwerey)

(via jemimaaslana)


Here are white men poised to run big marijuana businesses, dreaming of cashing in big—big money, big businesses selling weed—after 40 years of impoverished black kids getting prison time for selling weed, and their families and futures destroyed. Now, white men are planning to get rich doing precisely the same thing? …

After waging a brutal war on poor communities of color, a drug war that has decimated families, spread despair and hopelessness through entire communities, and a war that has fanned the flames of the very violence it was supposedly intended to address and control; after pouring billions of dollars into prisons and allowing schools to fail; we’re gonna simply say, we’re done now? I think we have to be willing, as we’re talking about legalization, to also start talking about reparations for the war on drugs, how to repair the harm caused. …

At the end of apartheid in South Africa there was an understanding that there could be no healing, no progress, no reconciliation without truth. You can’t just destroy a people and then say ‘It’s over, we’re stopping now.’ You have to be willing to deal with the truth, deal with the history openly and honestly.

Michelle Alexander, associate professor of law at Ohio State University and author of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness quoted from White Men Get Rich from Legal Pot, Black Men Stay in Prison. Alexander’s thesis is that the USA is addicted to caste systems, regardless of what is deemed legal or illegal. (via nezua)

(via boredangry)


milkteasympathy:

CLOTHING LIFE HACKS

(via lifesgoingoutofstyle)